You want to be a traveling PT as a new grad, but you fear what might happen if you aren’t supported with mentorship.

 

Your concerns are real.

 

You fear that not having mentorship at your assignment could jeopardize your patient care, your license, even your sanity.
You fear you that you will show up and be expected to see a full caseload on the first day with little to no orientation and unreasonable productivity standards.
Maybe, you heard what people say about travel:
 You won’t have mentorship.
You will be thrown to the wolves.
You will be the only one in the clinic.
Granted, there are places out there where this could happen,
But it does NOT have to happen to you.

 

How? 

 

The Interview.

By asking the right questions during the interview, you can determine if the job is the right fit for you, as a new grad. Specific questions about mentorship, productivity, and orientation are important, but knowing what the answers actually mean are key to determining if the job is what you are looking for.

          At our first assignment, we asked about productivity during the interview, but because we did not fully understand what the answer actually meant, we put ourselves in a difficult situation.

It is important to establish expectations during the interview. And just because you interview for a job and they offer you the position, does not mean you have to accept it. You are in complete control of which jobs you accept and those you decline.

          Gabe’s first job offer out of school was for a Director of Rehab at a SNF- obviously, not a good fit. He declined.

However, there are positions available that do support new grads, in new settings, with orientation, and support.

          At our second assignment, the company oriented us all we needed to know about home care, even though we had no prior experience in the setting. They provided us ample amount of time to train each of us with a preceptor and educate us fully. They did not pressure us to work beyond our capabilities as we became acquainted to the computer system and documentation required of home care. The staff was supportive, and we each had a preceptor and a director available to answer questions, whenever we needed. 

In conclusion, not all jobs are appropriate for new grads, and it is important to know what questions to ask during the interview to help weed out those that are not.
How do you know what questions to ask and what the answers mean? 

 

Travel Therapy Mentorship.

Be supported throughout the interview process, learn what questions to ask, and chat with us before your interview in order to set yourself up for success as a new grad traveling therapist by signing up for our Travel Therapy Course and Mentorship Program: https://wanderlustpts.com/get-started/#mentorship.
Learn the ins and outs of travel before you go with The Ultimate Course for the New Traveling Therapist, launching really soon. If you want to be one of the first people to hear about it, make sure to join the Wait-List!
Join the Wait- List.
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